GDPR and Apache logs, remove last octet of an IP address

For a new project I had to identify the source network of visitors of an http site, served via Apache. I did not need their individual IP address. This is something you’ll encounter when dealing with logs in light of the GDPR and having to store only the minimum amount of personal data necessary.

In essence it meant I needed a way to store the log requests and remove the last octet of the IPRead more.

Sync sightings between MISP instances

MISP sighting is a system allowing people to react on attributes on an event. It was originally designed to provide an easy method for users to tell when they see a given attribute, giving it more credibility. As such, the sighting system in MISP allows you to get feedback from your community on the quality of the data (the indicators).

There is not immediately an option within MISP to sync sightings between instances.You can syncRead more.

Dark Web TLS/SSL Certificates Highlight Need for Shift to Zero Trust Security

I published an article on the IBM SecurityIntelligence blog on Dark Web TLS/SSL Certificates Highlight Need for Shift to Zero Trust Security

The post has a very brief introduction to HTTPS and TLS/SS, takes a look at the ‘black market’ for TLS/SSL certificates and concludes with some protection measures that you can take.

Missed DNS Flag Day? It’s Not Too Late to Upgrade Your Domain Security

I published an article on the IBM SecurityIntelligence blog on Missed DNS Flag Day? It’s Not Too Late to Upgrade Your Domain Security. The post gives some insights on DNS Extension mechanisms, Backward Compatibility and DNS Flag Day and which steps you need to take to be (and remain) ready for DNS Flag Day. I also includes an introduction on other DNS features as DNS cookies and DNSSEC.

Breaking Down the Incident Notification Requirements in the EU’s NIS Directive

I published an article on the IBM SecurityIntelligence blog on Breaking Down the Incident Notification Requirements in the EU’s NIS Directive. The posts focus specifically on the aspects of incident notification contained in the NIS Directive as they apply to operators of essential services (OES).

Improving DNS logging, dnstap on Ubuntu

DNS logging and monitoring is important! Monitoring DNS logs allows you to analyze and detect C&C traffic and have access to crucial information to reduce the dwell time and detect breaches. Combined with Passive DNS it’s a very valuable data source to be used during incident response.

But DNS logging comes at a price. Every log operation requires the system to write out an entry to disk (besides also properly formatting the log string). ThisRead more.

Why You Need a BGP Hijack Response Plan!

I published an article on the IBM SecurityIntelligence blog on Why You Need a BGP Hijack Response Plan. The posts starts with an introduction to BGP, how BPG routing exactly works and what a BGP hijack is.

The bulk of this type of incident response plan is done during the preparation and detection phase, for the containment, eradication and recovery you will most likely have to depend on your upstream ISPs.

Hunt for devices with default passwords (with Burp)

In my previous post I talked about using the nmap NSE scripts or Hydra to search for systems with default passwords. My approach involved two steps: first learn via Burp how the authentication works (getting to know the form elements etc.) and then use this information as input for the brute force scripts.

A colleague pointed out that you can also use Burp suite for this last step.

Similar as with the previous approach, firstRead more.

Hunt for devices with default passwords

I wrote a follow-up on using Burp for both the analysis and attack phase : Hunt for devices with default passwords (with Burp).

Using a strong and unique password for authentication is a key element in security. Unfortunately there are still a lot of devices installed with a default password. This post describes how you can find the web interface of these devices.

Before we start, it’s to important to list the three different webRead more.

How to Use Passive DNS to Inform Your Incident Response

I published an article on How to Use Passive DNS to Inform Your Incident Response on the Security Intelligence blog.

This article gives you an insight on the different logging options for DNS traffic and how the historical records in passive DNS can help you during incident response. I included references to generating passive DNS data based on your traffic and which options you have for consuming it from a client perspective.