Incident Response: 5 Steps to Prevent False Positives

I published an article on the IBM Security Intelligence blog : Incident Response: 5 Steps to Prevent False Positives. The article describes how false positives look like and how they can interfere with your incident response and threat intelligence processes.

I propose 5 steps to prevent false positives, including

Prevent false positives from being added to threat intel report Notify analysts on likelihood of false positives in threat intel reports Report sightings, observables and falseRead more.

MISP service monitoring with Cacti

I published a post on the misp-project website on MISP service monitoring with Cacti.

The post covers how to use Cacti to monitor the performance and well-functioning of a MISP server. This includes

CPU, load average, memory usage and swap usage (based on default Cacti templates) Interface statistics, logged in users and running processes (based on default Cacti templates) MISP workers and job count MISP event, attribute, users and organisation statistics HTTP response time

Creating a MISP Galaxy, 101

I posted an article on the website of the MISP project on how to start with creating your own MISP galaxy / cluster.

Install MITRE ATT&CK Navigator in an isolated environment

The ATT&CK Navigator is a great tool to browse the ATT&CK matrices. You can run the tool directly from Github, but you can also install it locally. This can especially be useful if you want to browse the ATT&CK matrices when you’re working in an isolated environment.

Navigator can be used via Docker, but that instance does not contain the matrices. Next is a short overview of commands to get the Navigator to work locally,Read more.

Create and delete training alerts in TheHive

TheHive is a scalable, open source and free Security Incident Response Platform, which tightly integrates with MISP. It supports a feature that allows you to convert one or more alerts, for example alerts sent by security devices, to a security case (an investigation). The creation, and handling, of these alerts can be done via an API.

Creating, and then afterwards deleting, these alerts to showcase the features of TheHive during a training session can beRead more.

Report sightings from Kibana to MISP

A problem we all face when using threat intelligence data is getting rid of false positives in our data feeds. On the other hand, reporting of true positives is equally important as it allows to increase the level of trust in an indicator.

I published a post on the NVISO blog, “Report sightings from Kibana to MISP“, which provides a solution for this problem.

COVID-19 Blocklists

A lot of good initiatives popped up recently to combat malicious activity related to the Corona pandemic.

A MISP instance for tracking COVID-19 activity; A list of domains which provides legitimate COVID-19 services; The Slack channel of COVID19 Cyber Threat Coalition; The COVID-19 CTI League; Public MISP feed by DCSO; And a feed by 1984.sh; Threat reports by RiskIQ; A COVID-19 threat list by domaintools; The COVID-19 domain classifier by SANS; A MISP warning listRead more.

Integrating MISP and Cytomic Orion

Cytomic Orion is a solution for Threat Hunting & Incident Response, that speeds up the process of identification, investigation, containment, and remediation of cyber threats & insiders using Living-off-the-Land techniques to evade existing controls (Reduce the MTTD & MTTR). The Cytomic Orion API allows you to integrate it with other tools, one of those tools is MISP.

The integration with Cytomic Orion allows you to achieve two main goals :

Query the Cytomic Orion API,Read more.

Parse stored Windows Event logs with Security Onion

Security Onion is a free tool to monitor for suspicious activity in network events. I find it very easy to use, especially if you integrate the MISP threat data with the Bro -Zeek- intelligence framework. Besides investigating network events, you can also use it to analyze Windows Event logs, both from a live event stream and for analyzing stored Windows events.

Winlogbeat, part of Elastic, is the shipper that we will use to send theRead more.

Use Sysmon DNS data for incident response

Recent versions of Sysmon support the logging of DNS queries. This is done via event ID 22 in Applications and Services Log > Microsoft > Windows > Sysmon Operational.

To enable DNS logging, you need to include the section DnsQuery in your Sysmon configuration file. For example via

Note that enabling DNS queries can be noisy. It’s best to apply filtering as proposed by the SwiftOnSecurity sysmon config file and, additionally, filter out the commonlyRead more.